Sunday, January 31, 2021

Sunday 31st January 2021..a quiet day to end the month!

This makes interesting reading, well it did for me...





Don't like Canada's new mandatory quarantine? It's part of why New Zealand is now back to normal

By March 20, New Zealand closed its border to basically anyone except residents, directly in opposition to the recommendations of the WHO

Author of the article:

Tristin Hopper


Article content

On Friday the Government of Canada announced a new program prescribing mandatory supervised hotel quarantines for all travellers entering the country. It’s one of the strictest measures yet imposed in the fight against COVID-19, but it’s a measure with good precedent: New Zealand, one of the most enthusiastic adopters of mandatory hotel quarantines, has been ranked the best performing county in an index of almost 100 countries based on their containment of the coronavirus.

As we here in Canada undertake the grim task of reviewing our ICU triage protocols, New Zealanders are packing into stadiums without masks and celebrating New Year’s Eve in dense crowds just like the old days. COVID-19 has killed 18,000 Canadians and counting, while New Zealand is at 25 deaths. The Pacific Island nation had a breach this week, with a couple of positive cases of the South African COVID variant, all linked to the same quarantine facility in Auckland. While New Zealand has been lucky, it largely has itself to credit for its success.


Being an island in the middle of nowhere does help

New Zealand is a developed country plugged into world trade with a vibrant tourist sector, so there’s no inherent geographic reason they couldn’t have been hit by COVID-19 as hard as everybody else. Notably, another English-speaking island nation — Ireland — counted the world’s highest COVID-19 rate recently. But when it comes to containing pandemics, it’s no accident that some of the countries best able to ward off COVID-19 (Taiwan, Japan, Singapore) have been islands. If Canada wants to close its borders, it has to worry about more than 100 land crossings with the United States, not to mention a porous 9,000 kilometre border littered with illicit conduits. But when New Zealand wants to crack down on who gets in, all it really has to do is keep an eye on its six international airports.

The country’s isolation and small size also means it had far fewer foreign arrivals potentially seeding New Zealand communities with COVID-19 in the early days of the pandemic. In all of 2019, 3.8 million people entered New Zealand from abroad, including both tourists and citizens returning home. By contrast, in 2019 Canada counted 22.1 million foreign arrivals and 12.3 million of its own citizens returning home from foreign countries. In addition, while most foreigners coming into New Zealand hail from Australia — another country largely sidestepped by the pandemic — Canada had to contend with having a number of direct air links with many of the earliest COVID-19 epicentres, such as Italy, Iran and New York City.





New Zealand confirms first coronavirus case in months

COVID-1117.png

Chris Selley: 'COVID zero' is not going to happen in Canada. Stop pretending otherwise


Borders closed much, much earlier

Even after China imposed a complete lockdown on Wuhan, the city that spawned COVID-19, Canadian public health officials vigorously resisted all requests for a travel ban or even basic screening of air travellers from the affected areas of China. In one statement that has failed to age well, Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam told a Commons committee on January 29, 2020 “as I have always said, the epidemic of fear could be more difficult to control than the epidemic itself.” New Zealand, like its Pacific Rim neighbours such as South Korea, Taiwan and Japan, had no such qualms. On February 2, before it had even recorded any confirmed cases, New Zealand completely closed its border with China and implemented tight screening on all other incoming travellers. By March 20, they had ramped up border controls to shut out basically anyone except New Zealand residents.

These measures were directly in opposition to the recommendations of the World Health Organization, who at the time were claiming that travel restrictions were “ineffective in most cases.” The border closures did not prevent COVID-19 from breaking out in New Zealand communities, but when paired with some of the world’s strictest lockdown measures, it allowed the country to completely purge itself of active cases by August. “Rapid, science-based risk assessment linked to early, decisive government action was critical,” concluded an assessment in the New England Journal of

The Kiwis take their quarantine way more seriously

It is very, very difficult to get into New Zealand right now. Even if you’re a New Zealand citizen, returning home is a highly regulated process that requires booking a spot in what’s known as Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ). All arrivals are immediately sent to government-managed hotels where they are isolated for 14 days, provided with meals and tested regularly. The system is currently booked up until April, so any Kiwi looking to jet overseas for a wedding or to sit at the deathbed of a loved one faces the prospect of being locked out of their home country for at least three months.

Until the new restrictions, Canada’s quarantine of international travellers, by contrast, has depended largely on the honour system. As of January 7, incoming travellers to Canada needed to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test, but prior to that the only real requirement was that foreign arrivals needed to pledge to quarantine for 14 days. Incredibly, Canada didn’t implement even basic airport temperature checks until July.

The New Zealand system is expensive (roughly $6,000 per arrival) but it’s very effective. As of October, 2020, the MIQ system had caught 215 cases of travellers entering New Zealand with a Covid infection.

There is much less red tape getting in the way

The critical early days of Canada’s response to COVID-19 was constantly hamstrung by different departments tripping over each other and often providing conflicting information. All 13 of Canada’s provinces and territories had to devise their own independent COVID-19 response plans, often with contradictory measures. In Alberta, neighbourhood-level COVID-19 data was provided from the get-go without controversy. Next door in B.C., meanwhile, health authorities claimed for months that such granular data would make the pandemic worse. Meanwhile, inaction at higher levels often led to massive gaps in Canada’s response. In May, for instance, Alberta had to dispatch its own screeners to Calgary and Edmonton airports after reports of federal authorities failing to provide basic quarantine guidance to international arrivals.

By contrast, New Zealand is a country of only five million people with a unitary government; they have one kind of license plate, one tax authority and one ministry of health managing the COVID-19 response. More than 80 per cent of New Zealanders have retained faith in their country’s lockdown measures in part because of consistent and honest messaging from a single source. On a broader level, New Zealand is also a country that has become adept at tackling logistical challenges on its own. When the nearest help is a three-hour flight away in Australia, New Zealand doesn’t have the luxury of neglecting defence, disaster preparedness or emergency response.




The parts of Canada that acted most like New Zealand have fared best

Canada’s pandemic response has been marred with obvious oversights that made the situation much worse than it needed to be. Most notably, a cascade of policy failures ensured that long-term care homes would be the deadliest in the world when it came to COVID-19. But there are pockets of the country that have largely avoided the carnage seen in the likes of Montreal or Toronto. Vancouver Island’s 900,000 people have suffered only 17 deaths. The Atlantic provinces have consistently kept cases at single digits despite largely keeping their economies open, and Nunavut now has zero active cases after experiencing only one death.

In all these cases, the success was due largely to the region’s efforts to control who was allowed in. The Atlantic provinces banded together into a quarantine bubble that requires pre-travel approval and mandatory self-isolation for outsiders. Vancouver Island has been able to informally cut itself off from the mainland by forbidding non-essential travel on BC Ferries. And Nunavut has had the most New Zealand-y policy of all by operating its own government-supervised quarantine hotels.

New Zealand’s response hasn’t been perfect. While New Zealanders have generally proved willing participants in their government’s plan to become an epidemiological fortress, they’ve still done dumb things like visit each other’s rooms in quarantine hotels.  But in basic terms, eliminating COVID-19 in a population is easy: Control who gets in, and then mercilessly isolate everyone else until the virus has been denied a chance to spread. In the end, New Zealand has simply proved more willing and capable to do so.


I like this quote..



And love this...




Stay safe and healthy!!


Yashi Kochi!!

Saturday, January 30, 2021

Saturday 30 th January 2021...a really nice day!!

Well I had a really fantastic two hours on the tennis court this morning...the sun was shining, my buddies were funny, we made some pretty good shots and just a joy to be out there!!





After tennis I went home got cleaned up and went to meet Lynn and her  local driver and handyman.....they had been and bought some food hampers and we went to the village about twenty minutes out of town where we were going to deliver the food.


There we met my friend Joyce who has a little casita in the village and really is like the local grandmother and does so much for the community.


This is some of the food hampers...





These two could not wait to have an apple and also wear the masks we had given them...





We went and walked around the community everyone was friendly and really the area is out in the country and very lovely but the level of poverty is stunning....





Most live in shacks like this without any facilities......


Thank you to all who have made a donation to this worthy ongoing cause.


We will go every weekend and deliver food and other small items people have donated.


Tonight it is my soccer team  playing on Tv so I am going to enjoy that....

Here are a few funnies for you!!


If you can't think of a word say "I forgot the English word for it." That way people will think you're bilingual instead of an idiot.  


I'm at a place in my life where errands are starting to count as going out.  


I'm getting tired of being part of a major historical event.    


At what point can we just start using 2020 as profanity? As in: "That's a load of 2020." or "What in the 2020." or "abso-2020-lutely."  


My goal for 2020 was to lose 10 pounds. Only have 14 to go. 

 

Kids today don't know how easy they have it. When I was young, I had to walk 9 feet through shag carpet to change the TV channel.  

 

Senility has been a smooth transition for me. 

 

I may not be that funny or athletic or good looking or smart or talented. I forgot where I was going with this.  

 

I think I'll just put an "Out of Order" sticker on my forehead and call it a day.   

 

When I was a kid I wanted to be older...this is not what I expected.  

 

Life is like a helicopter. I don't know how to operate a helicopter.  

 

It's probably my age that tricks people into thinking I'm an adult.  

 

Marriage Counselor: Your wife says you never buy her flowers. Is that true? Me: To be honest, I never knew she sold flowers.   

 

If 2020 was a math word-problem: If you're going down a river at 2 MPH and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to re-shingle your roof?     

 

Coronacoaster: noun; the ups and downs of a pandemic. One day you're loving your bubble, doing work outs, baking banana bread and going for long walks and the next you're crying, drinking gin for breakfast and missing people you don't even like.  


Stay safe and healthy!!


Yashi Kochi!!

Friday, January 29, 2021

Friday 29 th January 2021...an exercise free day for me!!

The usual lovely sunny day and I spent maybe four hours going around to eight different residents and collecting donations for the food hamper project...I am always amazed at the generous people in this  community ....I wore my mask at all times and just stayed outside on the street talking to the folks and collecting the pesos...it went really well.

Let’s have some fun with some photos from the archives......

Start off first with a quo we can all relate to...

My best man friend Larry not grateful for his birthday kiss, 2014!!

Forms of transportation..South  Africa...1975

 Bermuda police 1971..

I have been playing tennis a long time.....1972

Love this..

Boy have I ever done some great journeys...

Finally this one of my Aunt Rita and Uncle Bram......this was about eight years ago.....sadly Rita has passed away but my Dad’s brother and the oldest of the Pearson clan celebrated his 94 th birthday last month.
What I was trying to re-enact with my handkerchief tied over my head was my Grandad, Bram’s Dad who used to walk this same beach like this....

Hope you enjoyed these as much as I did??

Stay safe and healthy!!

Yashi Kochi!!
















Thursday, January 28, 2021

Thursday 28th January 2021...a very special birthday!!

Today is my adorable Sister in law’s birthday...I wrote this about

Janet in 2012, nothing has changed!!






Hope you had a spectacular day!!!

This is Sam with her Mum taken last year...



Happy day Janet!!


My day started at 5am with what I thought was an explosion of glass in my casita.....sounded like someone had thrown a heavy mortar round through my window.....


I turned the light on and got up and after I adjusted my eyes I saw that the kitchen floor all the way to the bed was covered in glass fragments......I got up and put my slippers on and walked towards the kitchen and realized what had happened.


The glass cover for the stove top had exploded and the front of the cover was over by my bed......


I checked the gas on the stove and nothing was on....I cannot even begin to tell you what happened...I know every night before I go to bed I always check the cover and I always place it down over the elements...just seems so very strange.



Sorry not a great shot I guess I was in shock...


Luckily I was not injured and there is no damage to anything else...later in the day I contacted my landlord who is in Boston right now and he was glad I was Ok and told me not to worry about replacing it he will do that when he returns next month.


As expected I could not go back to sleep so spent the time trying to get all the glass picked up...what a mess!!


Now great news my first time back with the boys on the tennis court for two hours of fun.....I was excited to be out there and had no pain at all and was able to move around and even managed the odd good shot or two!!


Afterwards I picked up some Donations for the food hamper project that I told you about yesterday.


Now going to enjoy what should be a really good soccer game from England..





This is tough reading but it needs to be said!!




Ventilators - Written by a nurse who works with them! 


 

THIS  IS  WHY  WE  MUST DO  AS  WE  ARE  TOLD  !!!!!!!!!!


 

Here you go folks... for those people who don't understand what it means to be on a ventilator but want to take the chance of going back to work, to the bar, beach, restaurant, etc.

For starters, it's NOT an oxygen mask put over the mouth while the patient is comfortably lying down and reading magazines.Ventilation for Covid-19 is painful intubation that goes down your throat.It is done under anesthesia for 2 to 3 weeks without moving, often upside down, with a tube inserted from the mouth up to the trachea and allows you to breathe to the rhythm of the lung machine. The patient can't talk or eat, or do anything naturally - the machine keeps you alive.

The discomfort and pain they feel from this, means medical experts have to administer sedatives and painkillers to ensure tube tolerance for as long as the machine is needed. It's like being in an artificial coma.

After 20 days from this treatment, a young patient loses 40% muscle mass and gets mouth or vocal cords trauma, as well as possible pulmonary or heart complications.

It is for this reason that old or already weak people can't withstand the treatment and die. Many of us are in this boat ... so stay safe unless you want to take the chance of ending up here.This is NOT the flu.

Add a tube into your stomach, either through your nose or skin for liquid food, a sticky bag around your butt to collect diarrhoea, a Foley to collect urine, an IV for fluids and meds, and A-line f to monitor your BP that is completely dependent upon finely calculated med doses, teams of nurses, CRNA’s and MA’s to reposition your limbs every two hours and lying on a mat that circulates ice-cold fluid to help bring down your 104-degree temp.


 

Does anyone want to try all that out?

If not, Wear a mask, Stay home, Stay Safe and Stay Well!


I like this..




Beautiful moon tonight but could not do justice with this shot..





Stay safe and healthy!!


Yashi Kochi!!

Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Wednesday 27th January 2021.....a new project!!

It seems everyday is the same here as far as the weather is concerned....


Around 9 am it starts to warm up and stay very sunny and about 76 degrees until the sun goes down but the evenings are not cold even though we sit at 6500 feet.....I have not used the heater once this winter..I think it makes a huge difference to your well being to be in the sun especially in Covid days....


I went to the physio again this morning, I have one more session left after this and Fernanda started me off with  20 minutes on the stationary bike and then some bending and flexing exercises  before she put the electro magnetic machine on me and a massage of the knee...she really is very good.


After the busy days of the Three Kings toy drive work I have been looking for a little project and I have joined forces with another caring lady in town and we have started a little project to raise money by donation and buy food hampers for some families in the campo.


I know there is so much poverty in these areas and we can only do so little but at least we will change and help some families...


For a donation of 200 pesos, work that out in your own currency, we can buy food staples and some fruit that will adequately feed a family of 4 for one week.


This is the article I posted on my FB page, my blog and also by personal emails to my mailing list..



Many on the Cilvil List know me as the organizer of the Three Kings Toy drive and a long time resident of SMA. I am joining forces with a wonderful and caring SMA resident Lynn Ramsey, and together we intend to start fundraising for the purchase of despensas/food hampers. The food will be delivered to the many needy families living in the campos surrounding San Miguel.


For a donation of 200 pesos we can buy important food staples that will feed a family of four for a week!


If you would like to donate to this worthy caring cause be assured that all the money will go towards buying food.


I have a scooter and am more than happy to pick up your donation.


Three ways to give:

*a one time donation of 200 pesos

*a one time donation of 800 pesos to feed a family for a month

*an ongoing donation every week or month (I can collect it from you)


If you have any questions I can be contacted at mexicokid77@yahoo.com


Cell phone 415-178-3540 (I cannot retrieve messages)


If you do not live in San Miguel and want to donate, please contact me for arrangements.


 Best wishes


Les Pearson 


I am happy to report that already the donations are coming in...people are so generous and giving!!


I took the dogs on a long hike this afternoon they love it and so do I..here they are waiting for their drink.





Tonight going to watch a soccer game from England!!


This photo was sent to me by a really great friend who is pregnant with her first child......I think this is just a great shot!!!







Stay safe and healthy!!


Yashi Kochi!!


Tuesday, January 26, 2021

Tuesday 26 th January 2021...a productive day

Starting out with me meeting another resident who resides here and we are going to form a small coalition and raise money for food hampers for poor families in some of the campos.....more on this in a few days!!

the other day I took my friend Vic on my canyon hike that I love so much and he brought along his drone...Vic sent me the link hope you can open it and see for yourselves why I like this hike so much!!

https://drive.google.com/file/d/186bG_HgsYqMPcaRWSGpJhg-4tkknVz2q/view?usp=drive_web


This appeals to my sense of humour!!





My friend Linda who lives in Tucson sent me this photo from her window of the snow capped mountains!!



So be honest here on a scale of one to ten on the cute scale how do I rate????



Stay safe and healthy!!


Yashi Kochi!!





Monday, January 25, 2021

Monday 25th January 2021......a new week!!

This morning I went to the physio again I have two more sessions left and Fernanda again gave me plenty of strength exercises..I do think the swelling is going down but again I have no pain at all.

I was home by 1pm and stayed home the rest of the day..just puttering around with all my plants inside and out, some lounging on my new chair, reading...doing the tennis schedule for February.....

I like this...




Also like this..from my blog a few years ago!!

Some pearls of wisdom here!!!


Gas Pump Wisdom
A Johannesburg, South Africa filling station has become quite a landmark with its daily #PetrolPumpWisdom – uplifting quotes written on a chalkboard.  Some motorists say they deliberately travel this route just to read the quote which brightens their day.
Here’s a selection:
chalkboard-quotes3
chalkboard-quotes16
chalkboard-quotes
chalkboard-quotes14
chalkboard-quotes13
chalkboard-quotes6
chalkboard-quotes7
chalkboard-quotes8
The lady behind this wonderful initiative at Hutton Hyde Park is Alison Billett.
She told SAPeople: “We inherited the board from the previous owner, Dick Hutton, when we bought the filling station from him almost 20 years ago.
“We continued the tradition and it has become a landmark – more so now that it’s on social media!
chalkboard-quotes11
“Not a day goes by when I don’t get a call or a visit from someone to tell me how much they appreciate the message – it seems that every day there’s something that just speaks to what is going on in someone’s life and that inspires or motivates them.
chalkboard-quotes9
“Having people come and tell me their stories and how the quote helped them in some small way is what motivates me to keep writing!
“We use a variety of quotations – some are topical, some are funny, some are inspirational, some even reflect what is going on in my life that day!
chalkboard-quotes10
“Different things appeal to different people...
chalkboard-quotes15
“The boards were spotted by a motivational speaker from the UK, Geoff Ramm, when he was driving by one day and he was so taken by them he included a piece about them in his book!
chalkboard-quotes5
“The boards have appeared many times in newspapers and magazines and been spoken about on radio stations all over the world. 9GAG has re-tweeted them a few times too!”
Bob 95 FM in the USA recently posted Alison’s “Rest in Peace” quote which has now been shared over a quarter of a million times around the world!
peace-chalkboard
“Probably the most reaction we got from members 

My dinner tonight 

It was a spectacular sunset ton but not capture the full glory...

Stay safe and healthy!!

Yashi Kochi!!



Sunday 2 nd October 2022…town busy, me not so!!!

 Today is perhaps the busiest, noisiest, and loudest day of the year in town with the celebrations going on for the patron saint of the town...