Saturday, June 30, 2018

Saturday 30 th June 2018...just a slow day...NOT!!!!

Had a good breakfast before saying my goodbyes at the Airbnb and today was going to be a travelling day with lots of unknown places to visit.


My first stop was here in the village where I am staying to see this mans grave...









Next was the lovely market town of Bakewell and as luck would have it today was a celebration day and there were street musicians and dancers, farmers market and food stalls and of course great weather...









This bridge is quite amazing I have seen locks on bridges before and mainly in Europe but there were hundreds of locks on this bridge...


















These puppets remind me of the ones in SMA..









After a stay in Bakewell is was onto Monsal Head and the bridge..












Walked down and around quite lovely...


This was my next stop....






In this photo below it was impossible to get one of the rocks alone because this man stripped down to his shorts decided the big rock in the middle was a great place to sunbathe.....many people wanted photos and I walked down to him and politely asked if he could find another rock not in the circle as many of us wanted photos but not of your belly......his reply was unprintable!!!









My mind wondered what ceremonies have taken place here during the years..






Next it was to the Magpie mine a very well preserved mine..














And finally to here...












It seems there are many such circles throughout this area..


Some photos on the drive...






What Englishmen do on a warm sunny afternoon...





For uninitiated...cricket!!








At 5 pm I went to the home of Margaret and Ian....we have been friends for 55 years and Ian and I grew up together in the Salvation Army and were great buddies all through our young teen age years.....










I always come to visit them and I always get treated to a great meal this time in a pub close to their home....thanks for dinner and great to catch up!!


I was home around 10.30pm and had an enjoyable weekend...


My car insurance expires at midnight so no more driving and thank you Janet for the loan of Little Jan!!!


You do know that by clicking on any individual photo you can make it largerđź‘Ť


Yashi Kochi!!


Friday, June 29, 2018

Silly me!!!!

I obviously got too much sun today.....I posted part two before part one..so you know what to do..keep scrolling!!!!!

PART TWO!!!!!


This is the second post and a continuation of the above..



Finally my last accent was through Winnants Pass so beautiful...















and then to go behind the castle ...



















Peveril Castle (also Castleton Castle or Peak Castle)[1] is a ruined 11th-century castle overlooking the village of Castleton in the English county of Derbyshire. It was the main settlement (or caput) of the feudal barony of William Peverel, known as the Honour of Peverel,[2] and was founded some time between the Norman Conquest of 1066 and its first recorded mention in the Domesday Survey of 1086, by Peverel, who held lands in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire as a tenant-in-chief of the king. The town became the economic centre of the barony. The castle has views across the Hope Valley and Cave Dale.


William Peveril the Younger inherited his father's estates, but in 1155 they were confiscated by King Henry II. While in royal possession, Henry visited the castle in 1157, 1158, and 1164, the first time hosting King Malcolm IV of Scotland. During the Revolt of 1173–1174, the castle's garrison was increased from a porter and two watchmen to a force led by 20 knights shared with the castles of Bolsover and Nottingham. The Earls of Derby had a claim to the Peveril family's estates through marriage, and in 1199 William de Ferrers, the fourth earl, paid 2,000 marks for the Peak lordship, although the castle remained under royal control. The closest Peveril Castle came to seeing battle was in 1216, when King John gave the castle to William de Ferrers, but the castellan refused to relinquish control. Although they were both John's supporters, the king authorised the earl to use force to evict the castellan, who eventually capitulated, although there is no evidence that the castle was assaulted.

In 1223 the castle returned to the Crown. In the 13th century there were periods of building work at the castle, and by 1300 its final form had been established. Toward the end of the 14th century, the barony was granted to John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. Having little use for the castle, he ordered some of its material to be stripped out for re-use, marking the beginning of its decline. From the time of John of Gaunt to the present day, the castle has been owned and administered by the Duchy of Lancaster. Peveril Castle became less important administratively, and by 1609 it was "very ruinous and serveth for no use".[3] In the 19th century, Sir Walter Scott featured the castle in his novel Peveril of the Peak. The site is situated in a national park, and cared for by English Heritage. Peveril Castle is protected as a scheduled monument and a Grade I listed building.Peveril Castle (also Castleton Castle or Peak Castle)[1] is a ruined 11th-century castle overlooking the village of Castleton in the English county of Derbyshire. It was the main settlement (or caput) of the feudal barony of William Peverel, known as the Honour of Peverel,[2] and was founded some time between the Norman Conquest of 1066 and its first recorded mention in the Domesday Survey of 1086, by Peverel, who held lands in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire as a tenant-in-chief of the king. 


William Peveril the Younger inherited his father's estates, but in 1155 they were confiscated by King Henry II. While in royal possession, Henry visited the castle in 1157, 1158, and 1164, the first time hosting King Malcolm IV of Scotland. During the Revolt of 1173–1174, the castle's garrison was increased from a porter and two watchmen to a force led by 20 knights shared with the castles of Bolsover and Nottingham. The Earls of Derby had a claim to the Peveril family's estates through marriage, and in 1199 William de Ferrers, the fourth earl, paid 2,000 marks for the Peak lordship, although the castle remained under royal control. The closest Peveril Castle came to seeing battle was in 1216, when King John gave the castle to William de Ferrers, but the castellan refused to relinquish control. Although they were both John's supporters, the king authorised the earl to use force to evict the castellan, who eventually capitulated, although there is no evidence that the castle was assaulted.

In 1223 the castle returned to the Crown. In the 13th century there were periods of building work at the castle, and by 1300 its final form had been established. Toward the end of the 14th century, the barony was granted to John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. Having little use for the castle, he ordered some of its material to be stripped out for re-use, marking the beginning of its decline. From the time of John of Gaunt to the present day, the castle has been owned and administered by the Duchy of Lancaster. Peveril Castle became less important administratively, and by 1609 it was "very ruinous and serveth for no use".[3] In the 19th century, Sir Walter Scott featured the castle in his novel Peveril of the Peak. The site is situated in a national park, and cared for by English Heritage. Peveril Castle is protected as a scheduled monument and a Grade I listed building.









I had already walked nine miles and I was a tad drained but this did the trick...






I still had to walk through the village...















And back along this stream to Hope and where I had parked Little Jan...


The first order was to make a cuppa tea and followed by a long soak in the tub....


A light snack of strawberries and yogurt for supper and going to read my book and get an early night!!


Yashi Kochi!!!

Friday 29th June 2018..... part one!!!!

Today was a long day with lots of photos so I am going to break it up into two posts so after you have read this(and enjoyed it)..please scroll down for part two!!


Marion provided a lovely healthy breakfast and I was on the road before 9 am..it was to be a big hiking day up to the summit of...





Mam Tor is a 517 m (1,696 ft) hill near Castleton in the High Peak of Derbyshire, England. Its name means "mother hill",[1] so called because frequent landslips on its eastern face have resulted in a multitude of "mini-hills" beneath it.[2] These landslips, which are caused by unstable lower layers of shale, also give the hill its alternative name of Shivering Mountain.[3] In 1979, the continual battle to maintain the A625 road (Sheffield to Chapel en le Frith) on the crumbling eastern side of the hill was lost when the road officially closed as a through-route.










The hill is crowned by a late Bronze Age and early Iron Age univallate hill fort, and two Bronze Age bowl barrows.[4] At the base of the Tor and nearby are four show caves: Blue John Cavern, Speedwell Cavern, Peak Cavern and Treak Cliff Cavern where lead, Blue John, fluorspar and other minerals were once mined.

Simon Jenkins rates the panorama from Kinder Scout to Stanage Edge as one of the top ten in England.


I started the hike in Hope and this is the first peak I have to conquer...






This so reminds me of my Camino days!!!






Yes that is where I am heading...









Finally made it to the top and the view back to my starting point was great...






Also the view to where I am heading...










The next peak..


Loved this shot I came down and saw this lady






 and stood behind her and quietly told her that it is a fantastic shot would you like me take it for you...she was elated and said yes and then she took the same for me..









If anyone mentions that little patch at the top of my head instant ban from the blog and that does include you Croft..don’t care if you are six foot six!!!!


Away up to the summit..






Incredible views!!!!






This is the next summit Mam Tor I have to reach but first I have to go down which for me is harder than going up!!!




Made it!!!


This is the end of part one!!

Sunday 2 nd October 2022…town busy, me not so!!!

 Today is perhaps the busiest, noisiest, and loudest day of the year in town with the celebrations going on for the patron saint of the town...